Album Review: Drake’s vulnerability in Scorpion

While Scorpion is not Drake’s most impressive body of work to date, it does show him at one of his most vulnerable points.

Drake’s newest 25 track venture Scorpion breaks new ground for the Canadian R&B artist. He is open to tackling various genres within the album, openly embracing both rap (as seen in his most recent single “I’m Upset”) and R&B (as seen in “Jaded”).

While Scorpion is not Drake’s most impressive body of work to date, it does show him at one of his most vulnerable points. For example, the album confirmed the rumors addressed by Pusha T that Drake has a son. In “Emotionless” he remarks “I wasn’t hiding my kid from the world, I was hiding the world from my kid”. The song “March 14” is very personal, as Drake reveals his personal expectations as the father he wanted to be, versus the one he has become.

“Summer Games” has a sound reminiscent of Thank Me Later (2010) but heartfelt emotions that reflect the current work. This stand out track on Part B of the album gives us the glimpse in Drake’s more personal side that we desire however still leaves fans wanting more.

Despite the pomp and circumstance surrounding the Degrassi reunion featured in release of the “I’m Upset” music video, the song was a misstep in an otherwise solid track list. The song lacks the soulful elements that hold the album, alongside some of Drake’s greatest tracks together.

There was several surprising collaborations on the album to say the least. One of which includes the posthumous pop legend Michael Jackson on “Don’t Matter to Me”. Jackson’s feature was pulled from an unreleased 1983 session. The backing harmonies of Jackson’s voice brings back the King of Pop but is otherwise an unnecessary addition to the album.

Scorpion provided an excellent mix of the Drake we know and love with some new experimental twists. While it was not a groundbreaking body of work, it definitely proves he is still an artist to reckon with in the R&B genre.

*Photo courtesy of Drake’s official Facebook

 

Ryan Miller